News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • November 20, 2014

    INPROL Observes Universal Children's Day

    It is no accident that six of eight Millennium Development Goals relate directly to children, and providing for their basic security, educational, and health needs. As conflict environments become normalized across the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Central America, the number of children involved in fighting and fleeing has increased exponentially, along with the structural, economic, and legal disparities affecting their quality of life. The impact of generational trauma can be felt from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the Occupied Palestinian Territories, rendering the work of rule of law and peacebuilding practitioners all the more critical.

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  • November 19, 2014

    CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Towards a Rule of Law Culture: Exploring Effective Responses to Justice and Security Challenges (2015)

    The United States Institute of Peace (USIP), in partnership with the International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ), is pleased to announce a call for applications for the 2015 “Towards a rule of law culture: exploring effective responses to justice and security challenges” course held in Valletta, Malta.

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  • November 19, 2014

    Who is Responsible for Building Trust in Institutions?

    How do we build trust? How do we connect with our constituencies? How do we partner with them to tackle society's challenges, big and small? These are the issues institutions grapple with, whether they are governments, non-governments, businesses, or media and news organizations.

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  • November 19, 2014

    International Law and the Construction of the Liberal Peace: An Introduction

    The emergence of the international community has had a considerable impact upon the structure of international relations. This change in political structure has also had a dramatic impact upon the content of international law and in particular the objectives that international law pursues. The international society had previously formulated international legal norms that sought to protect state sovereignty, such as the non-intervention principle and the prohibition against the threat or use of force. The emergence of the international community has resulted in these rules being adapted in order to allow for the promotion of liberal values.

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  • November 19, 2014

    Carnegie Endowment BLOG: Why Nations Don't Fail

    Perhaps the most effective way of keeping a state together that should really be failing, is to use other non-state structures of governance to stabilize the systems. In non-failing states, it is often oligarchic, tribal, military, or clan structures that operate the system behind the facade of formal (but powerless) state institutions. Such systems might have a parliament, a government, parties, government departments, and all the other textbook insignia of modern statehood. But the shots are called elsewhere.

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  • November 18, 2014

    International Committee of the Red Cross BLOG: Using Traditional Law in Dialogues with Armed Groups

    The main sources of international humanitarian law (IHL) are international treaty and customary law. In addition, domestic traditional law can improve the protection of victims of armed conflict. The International Committee of the Red Cross's online Customary IHL Database was recently updated with the practice of five additional countries: Denmark, Djibouti, Poland, Tajikistan and Somalia. Omar Odeh, deputy head of the ICRC's delegation in Somalia, explains the importance of such traditional law.

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  • November 18, 2014

    United Nations War Crimes Commission (1943-48) Opens Its Records for the First Time in 70 Years

    The archives of the War Crimes Commission contain evidence submitted by 17 Member States, including lists of alleged war criminals, files of charges brought against them, minutes of meetings, reports, correspondence, trial transcripts, and related documentation about the activities of the Commission, its committees, and individuals identified as alleged war criminals, including evidence compiled against them and records related to their prosecution by national tribunals. Although some of the information in the documents has long been known to investigators and historians, prior to the Commission’s records being made available to the Museum, the public was unable to view the documents. Researchers at the UN, for instance, must petition for access through their governments.

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  • November 18, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: Afghan opium cultivation again rose to historic levels in 2014, United Nations officials reported last week. And in a sign of how deeply entwined drug trafficking and the Afghan political system have become, the officials said the protracted elections this year were at least part of the cause.

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  • November 17, 2014

    Video: Building Peace at the Nexus of Organized Crime, Conflict, and Extremism

    On November 13th, the International Peace AcademyI together with the Folke Bernadotte Academy, the SecDev Foundation, and the Center for International Peace Operations-ZIF, hosted a one-day workshop exploring the complex ways organized crime, conflict, and extremism interact and pose threats to peace, reflecting on how to devise effective responses, in particular for multilateral peace operations and peacebuilding actors.

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  • November 17, 2014

    Governance and Justice: "The Justice Audit"

    This public presentation of an innovative approach to opening up data in the Justice Sector is made available by Promita Sengupta, Head of Programme, Rule of Law, for the non-governmental organization GIZ Bangladesh. This report is the last in a series curated by Governance & Justice Group, which can be viewed in its entirety here.

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