News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • July 22, 2014

    Reinventing the Rules BLOG: Selecting the Right Indicators to Improve Court Performance

    In May, The World Bank released a short paper titled ‘An Introduction to Selecting the Right Indicators to Improve Court Performance.’ The report provides an overview of three different models used to measure court performance and also looks at data collection, the type of data that can be relied on, and how to ensure data collected translates into court reform.

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  • July 22, 2014

    Cop Cams Go Global

    In a series of remarkable pilots from New York to Kingston and Cape Town to Nairobi, police are starting to come under intensive scrutiny. Specially developed technologies are being deployed to protect ordinary people from arbitrary arrest and extra-judicial violence. These are already showing results. But perhaps the most interesting one of all is that these tools are not only welcomed by citizens: police officers themselves are equally enthusiastic about the idea.

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  • July 21, 2014

    ISIS Europe BLOG: Europe’s House of Cards? Between Democratic Deficit and CSDP Legitimacy

    Is there a genuine prospective for a new supranational democracy model (Meny 2002), encompassing the EU’s complex institutional background and its convoluted governance practices? Recent discussions on the role played by the European Parliament as the key institution most inclined to address the EU’s democratic deficit are particularly disheartening, especially in light of the recent European elections from last May and their Euro-sceptic orientation.

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  • July 21, 2014

    Convergent Technologies, Dual-Use Weaponry and the Global Balance of Power

    We should examine what our courses of action would be if advanced technologies do open the door to powerful new weapons systems. It is unlikely that the UN system can stem global proliferation of these new technologies and adequately monitor such activities. Some states may see this as an opportunity to acquire a strategic upgrade – seeking newer weapons systems that could ultimately rival nuclear weapons.

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  • July 18, 2014

    The Everyday Politics of International Intervention

    Scholars and Practitioners regularly emphasize that one-size-fits-all peacebuilding templates are ineffective and that adapting peacebuilding programs to each individual context is crucial. Yet interveners often replicate programs from previous deployments on different continents as if they should have the same effect in their new posting. Local people and interveners themselves deplore the expatriates’ tendency to live in a bubble, where they interact mostly with other expatriates and lack contact with host populations. Still, from Juba to Kabul many international interveners travel in white air-conditioned SUVs with locked doors and frequent only the “expat bars.” And it is now conventional wisdom that local ownership is essential for successful peacebuilding, but local stakeholders are rarely included in the design of international programs.

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  • July 18, 2014

    NGOs and the Shock of the New

    The big international aid agencies have been hugely successful. Organizations that were once small civil society operations - groups of friends with a passion to make the world a better place - now have thousands of staff members, multi-storey headquarters buildings and multi-million dollar budgets. But insiders fret that they have become too big and have lost the flexibility and responsiveness they once had.

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  • July 18, 2014

    Global Anticorruption BLOG: Does Bribery Pay? For Whom? And How Much?

    Anticorruption advocates—including those in the private sector who have taken the fight against corruption seriously—insist that bribery is bad for business. That’s likely true in the aggregate, and perhaps it’s true for some individual firms. But it’s probably not true for all firms—otherwise, why would so many of them pay bribes? But it’s hard to know how much firms benefit from bribery. Likewise, while would be useful to know more about the factors that affect the size and probability of bribery, figuring this out is a challenge because of the secrecy of corrupt transactions.

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  • July 18, 2014

    ISN BLOG: New Media and Latin American Violent Movements

    Social media is different than traditional internet resources because, with social media, terrorists are able to directly target individual followers. Thus, social media has increased the number of “lone wolf terrorists,” namely individuals who commit terrorist acts without being connected to a particular terrorist organization. With the rise of social media, Weimann argues that the war on terror has become increasingly “vital, dynamic, and ferocious,” and creates a new front in the struggle for international security.

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  • July 18, 2014

    Role of Media in Security Sector Reform in Africa

    Indeed there are many reasons to explain the heavy handedness of the security forces in most African states. The fact is that politicians in Africa have created situations that favor violence and civil disorder as means to seek redress for grievances intended to achieve their personal objectives, these same politicians have contributed to the weaknesses and shortcomings of the security sector, by mandating them to obey orders from them that are very often not in the national interest. The crux of the problem in the relationship between the media and the security sector is therefore the latters' abuse of power.

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  • July 17, 2014

    Oxford University Press BLOG: What Are the Most Important Issues in International Criminal Justice Today?

    While human history is not without crime and slaughter, it is only in the twentieth century, especially following the Nuremberg and Tokyo trials, that people sought justice in the name of all humanity. To mark the World Day for International Justice [Oxford University Press Blog]  invited our authors and editors to answer the question: What do you consider to be the most important issue in international criminal justice today?

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