News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • September 17, 2014

    Insight on Conflict BLOG: Peacebuilder Nations in Action

    In the last few years civil conflicts in Syria, Iraq, and Ukraine have crippled the notion of peace at national and international level. Before our very eyes we have seen violence leave many citizens without a home, without a family, and in some cases even without entire communities.  These are the latest in a series of long and unending international conflicts. A common ground for rebuilding peace and establishing reconciliation is still to be found. The international community’s efforts to diffuse the violence seem inefficient and weak. Peacebuilder nations have used all diplomatic means – through both international and their own foreign policies – to effectively control the escalation of conflict. It is a challenging time we live in and the state of the world causes many to look back at the first peacebuilders that realized their goals by applying the right to protect in a practical way.

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  • September 17, 2014

    Engaging with Students and Professors on the Issue of Sexual Violence in Armed Conflicts

    How can universities help raise awareness of the issue of sexual violence in armed conflict? Based on its reference publication “How does law protect in war?”, the International Committee of the Red Cross has designed a key tool to answer this question, in the form of a half-day workshop combining a film, presentations, group work and discussion.

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  • September 17, 2014

    Arab League’s Human Rights Court Will Not Bring Justice to Victims of Violations

    The International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) dismissed the adoption by the League of Arab States (LAS) of the Statute of the Arab Court of Human Rights as an empty gesture that will do nothing for the victims of human rights violations in the Middle East and North African (MENA) region. The Statute essentially restricts access to the Arab Court to States, rather than to the actual victims of the violations, relying on States to bring actions against other States, the ICJ says.

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  • September 17, 2014

    Democracy Digest BLOG: Let Locals take the Lead on ISIS

    ISIL did not emerge from nothing. There’s a reason why such a destructive force ascended in this part of the world at this moment in history. It ascended because a dictator in Syria has spent three years trying to crush what began as a peaceful democratic movement, destroying towns and cities, driving half the people of his country from their homes, until some of them became so desperate that they turned to the false deliverance and destructive fanaticism ISIL offered. It ascended because many in Iraq’s Sunni population felt legitimate grievances were ignored by the government in Baghdad. ISIL not only abuses human rights; it is the product of the abuse of human rights.

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  • September 16, 2014

    New Security Beat BLOG: ISIS’s Cruelty Toward Women Gets Scant Attention

    ISIS has received considerable world attention for its savage beheadings, executions of captured soldiers and men in conquered towns and villages, violence against Christians and Shiites, and the destruction of non-Sunni shrines and places of worship. But its barbarity against women has been treated as a side issue. Arab and Muslim governments, vocal on the threat ISIS poses to regional stability, have been virtually silent on ISIS’s systemic degradation, abuse, and humiliation of women. To the men of ISIS, women are an inferior race, to be enjoyed for sex and be discarded, or to be sold off as slaves.

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  • September 16, 2014

    Surviving Violence: Transgressing Categories and Boundaries in Armed Conflicts

    The persistent limitations in the civilian protection agenda have led some scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers to turn their attention away from the ‘top-down’ macro level and towards the ‘bottom-up’ micro level of analysis. Instead of understanding civilian protection as activities to be conducted in compliance with international law by states, multilateral institutions, or international organisations, attention is rapidly shifting towards the strategies used by civilians themselves. Conflict-affected populations rely on a sophisticated knowledge and assessment of their environment while simultaneously deploying and adapting their coping strategies to navigate violence. The aim of this new area of praxis is to examine the various self-protection strategies undertaken by individuals and communities affected by mass violence and atrocities. This emerging literature is largely based on the premise that individuals are often the first and last to guarantee their own safety during times of armed violence. Despite increasing attention towards self-protection tactics, however, there is little consensus on what self-protection means in both theory and practice.

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  • September 16, 2014

    What Role for UN Peacekeepers in Tackling Ebola?

    Comprised of around 4,500 troops, including eight formed police units, with a presence in 11 of 15 of Liberian counties, the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) represents a sizable international military and civilian presence in the country at a time when outside assistance is sorely needed. Depending on how the Ebola crisis evolves, UNMIL could prove to be the lynchpin of international efforts to maintain peace and security in the country. Alternatively, it could end up doing more harm than good. It is therefore worth asking what role UNMIL is playing in the fight against Ebola. What are peacekeepers doing to stop the virus and protect civilians? Can and should they be doing more?

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  • September 15, 2014

    European Journal of International Law BLOG: Refusing to Negotiate Can Have Tragic Consequences

    On August 19, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) released a video showing the beheading of American journalist James Foley, after the United States government refused to pay a nine-figure ransom. Foley’s execution prompted a debate about the propriety of paying ransoms:  on the one hand, paying can save the life of the captured hostage; on the other hand, paying ransoms fuels the very activity that gave rise to the need to pay a ransom in the first place.

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  • September 15, 2014

    TED: A Vision of Crimes in the Future

    The world is becoming increasingly open, and that has implications both bright and dangerous. Marc Goodman paints a portrait of a grave future, in which technology's rapid development could allow crime to take a turn for the worse.

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  • September 12, 2014

    World Bank BLOG: What Agha the Pakistani Street Child Thinks About Terrorism Will Surprise You

    A small boy ekes out a daily meal of naan and curry by picking up garbage in the streets of Lahore. That’s the premise of “I am Agha,” a short documentary film posted by three Pakistani filmmakers on a site called Pakistan Calling.   Watch the film to find out what Agha says about his life and what he thinks about terrorism.  Then reconsider what you think are Pakistan’s greatest problems.

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