News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • August 20, 2014

    OECD Insights BLOG: The State of the State: Building Confidence, Trust and Political Will

    For numerous communities torn apart by conflict, the state of the state can be a significant obstacle to rebuilding. Evidence shows us how the loss of the developmental scale and reach normally attributed to states can have a heavy impact on services and economic growth, even where civil society organisations are working hard to fill the gap. The African Development Bank has tried to calculate the developmental cost of conflict. Their analysis of three African countries suggests that it will take between 19 and 34 years to recover the levels of GDP lost to war and instability. The 2011 World Development Report found that the in countries most affected by violence, the poverty rate was 21% higher than in those not affected. These statistics mask very real human suffering: death, rape, malnutrition and displacement.

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  • August 20, 2014

    The Art of Mediation: Local Lessons for International Peacemakers

    After setting up mediation services in Eastern European countries emerging from societal upheaval and transitions to democracy, CEO Brad Heckman established the New York Peace Institute to resolve disputes between individuals in the city and address community-wide disturbances. His work in New York involves people from a variety of ethnic groups, cultural orientations, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and Mr. Heckman sees numerous parallels in mediating local-level and international disputes: “There’s a finite set of human reactions to conflict, and the set of tools that we use are equally applicable, whether it’s a neighbor noise dispute or a multiparty dispute involving ethnic groups internationally.”

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  • August 19, 2014

    Robust Peacekeeping Missions

    Peacekeeping missions such as the UN’s intervention brigade in the DRC (established within MONUSCO by Security Council resolution 2098) have important legal implications. Rather than a defensive role, the Brigade is the first United Nations peacekeeping unit specifically tasked to carry out targeted offensive operations to neutralize armed groups that threaten State authority and civilian security, with or without the Congolese Army. If the Brigade is considered a party to the conflict in the Congo, do peacekeepers become combattants? Can they be captured and detained? If wrongdoing occurs, where does responsibility fall? Issues of accountability were discussed this past summer, and an upcoming meeting symposium in Vienna will attempt to tackle the problems raised.

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  • August 19, 2014

    Jihadism in Central Asia: A Credible Threat After the Western Withdrawal From Afghanistan?

    Central Asian governments view with alarm and pessimism the withdrawal by the end of 2014 of most of the Western troops that have been present in Afghanistan since a NATO-led security mission began in 2001. Kabul’s neighbors expect the already-unstable situation in Afghanistan to deteriorate and threaten their own security and stability. They fear that a radical Islamist regime in Afghanistan will emerge from a Taliban military victory—a scenario that many Central Asian leaders and analysts believe is inevitable and will spill over across Afghanistan’s northern border.

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  • August 18, 2014

    Dispatches From the Robot Wars; Or, What is Posthuman Security?

    Posthuman security’ is an umbrella term I’m using to talk about a recent surge in thinking and writing at the nexus of posthumanist philosophy, security and ethics. It starts from the proposition that international security is not solely a matter of securing human lives and bodies. Diverse beings other than humans are implicated in the conditions of (in)security. Whether other animals, machines, networks, minerals, water, ecosystems or complex assemblages thereof, a wide range of beings other than humans shape the contexts of (in)security and the ways that we define them. This, in turn, challenges the engrained notion that the human is the ultimate referent object of security, ethics and philosophy.

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  • August 18, 2014

    Towards a Rule of Law Culture: Exploring Effective Responses to Justice and Security Challenges

    The United States Institute of Peace (USIP), in partnership with the International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ), is pleased to announce a call for applications for the five-day course, “Towards a rule of law culture: exploring effective responses to justice and security challenges.” The course will be held from 10-14 November 2014 in Valletta, Malta.

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  • August 15, 2014

    1914-2014: Shifting the Balance Between Peace and War

    The consequences of 1914 are embedded in our collective psyche: millions dead, the horror of trench warfare, and a further chain of post-war changes that would play out through the rest of the 20th century. In essence, the fundamental problem that unfolded on a grand scale 100 years ago remains familiar, and continues to characterise many, if not most, conflicts today. Actors take steps in the belief that they are providing protection and security, often in a defensive rather than an offensive frame of mind. Over time, their positions become fixed and mechanisms for dialogue and crisis management are neglected, so that when a political crisis does occur, actions are often based on assumptions (e.g., regarding the motives of others) that may be unfounded.

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  • August 15, 2014

    Gender Sensitive Police Reform and Political Representation: One Without the Other?

    In post-conflict settings, security sector reform (SSR) has primarily been a male dominated discourse. However, in the past decade, the significance of female perspectives and their contributive role has become a cornerstone of SSR practice. Despite this recognition, scant attention is paid to the facilitating conditions that would enable implementing bodies, such as the police, to engage in sustainable gender sensitive SSR.

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  • August 15, 2014

    EJIL BLOG: Towards a New Global Treaty on Crimes Against Humanity

    On Thursday, July 17, the International Law Commission moved the topic of crimes against humanity from its long-term to its active agenda and appointed Professor Sean D. Murphy as Special Rapporteur. The Rapporteur’s charge is to prepare a First Report, which will begin the process of proposing Draft Articles to the Commission for its approval. The expectation is that, in due course, the Commission will send a complete set of Draft Articles for use as a convention to the United Nations General Assembly. This was a crucial step in filling a normative gap that has persisted despite the development of international criminal law during the past decades:  the absence of a comprehensive global treaty on crimes against humanity.

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  • August 14, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: Illegal land seizures have added to the ongoing problems affecting the Nangarhar Canal, a decades-long infrastructure project in the eastern province.

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