News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • October 31, 2014

    Insight on Conflict BLOG: Terrorism in the Sahel: Fighting the Enemy Within, from Within

    We must accept that the fight against terrorism is not a fight that any one state can lead on its own. As elsewhere in the world, the collective efforts of all neighbouring countries and others are indispensable. We must also recognise that jihadists and actors like Boko Haram who hide behind Islam will not be defeated in a society with strong Islamic connections without the help and blessing of traditional leaders and local populations.

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  • October 31, 2014

    Open Society Voices BLOG: Five Legal Strategies that Preserve the Rights of Women Living with HIV

    Without legal strategies to protect women’s inheritance or property, women can be kicked out of their home upon the death of their spouse, and the resulting financial hardship and lack of resources can make women less able to seek or continue treatment, or to protect themselves in relationships. The Uganda Network on Law, Ethics, and HIV/AIDS (UGANET) provides legal aid as a way to promote human rights and an ethical response to HIV and AIDS. Their strategies include law reform, strategic litigation, engagement with legal structures, education, and international advocacy.

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  • October 30, 2014

    A Drone is not a Cop – UN Rights Expert Concerned about Technologies that Depersonalize the Use of Force

    The United Nations Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, Christof Heyns, raised concern about the increasing use of technologies that depersonalize the use of force –including armed drones– not only on the battlefield, but also in domestic law enforcement.  According to the independent expert’s report, the protection of rights such as the right to life and personal security, and of human dignity weighs against the police outsourcing their work to machines, if this means the police no longer have meaningful control.

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  • October 30, 2014

    Penal Reform International BLOG: No Escape from Violence: Childhood Abuse, Offending and Women in Prison

    In 2012, a small but innovative, participatory study with women prisoners in South Africa found that 38% of participants reported physical abuse as a child, with 29% reporting sexual abuse, and 67% experiencing physical or sexual abuse as an adult. The study also found a strong link between childhood sexual abuse and rape and violent offending by women.

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  • October 29, 2014

    Transparency International BLOG: How Do We Stop Countries from Exporting Corruption?

    Fifteen years have passed since the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development Anti-Bribery Convention was introduced to the world. Under this treaty, leading economies made commitments that they will criminalise, investigate and prosecute those individuals and companies that bribe public officials of other countries. When looking at the performance of the countries that are parties to the convention, it is obvious much needs to be done to reach the goal of a corruption-free global economy.

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  • October 29, 2014

    World Bank BLOG: Is the Idea of ‘Areas of Limited Statehood’ Useful or Superfluous?

    The idea of ‘areas of limited statehood’ is that while most states in the world today have not failed and are not about to fail, they nevertheless have within them areas where they either cannot implement central policies or exercise security control or both. They have ungoverned or hard- to- govern spaces, sometimes vast ones. Most states, therefore, do not really have full command of the territories that they are supposed to govern under international law.

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  • October 29, 2014

    Accountability, Transparency, Participation, and Inclusion: A New Development Consensus?

    Four key principles—accountability, transparency, participation, and inclusion—have in recent years become nearly universal features of the policy statements and programs of international development organizations. Yet this apparently widespread new consensus is deceptive: behind the ringing declarations lie fundamental fissures over the value and application of these concepts. Understanding and addressing these divisions is crucial to ensuring that the four principles become fully embedded in international development work.

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  • October 28, 2014

    The Global Initiative Against Organized Crime BLOG: The Future of the United Nations Transnational Organized Crime Convention (UNTOC)? Does Un-Reviewed Equate to Irrelevant?

    Even though the protocols – on Firearms, Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants – are generally the area where United Nations Transnational Organized Crime Convention (UNTOC) is seen to have performed quite well, even there the Convention seems to be struggling for relevance at a time when these issues are dominating international discourse. As both North America and Europe deal with unprecedented migration crises facilitated by criminal smuggling groups, the issue failed to warrant emphasis in the UNTOC deliberations. Despite the spotlight currently shining on the role of criminal networks in the trafficking of wildlife, there appears little appetite to discuss strengthening UNTOC as a mechanism to respond.

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  • October 28, 2014

    New Database to Research Decisions of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

    Loyola Law School Los Angeles has a new, student-run project on the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.  The website includes a database and journal to assist practitioners, journalists, students, and other scholars in understanding the Inter-American system of justice.  The website includes 74 summaries of decisions rendered by the Inter-American Court of Human RIghts and a searchable database.

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  • October 28, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: In a paper from Stability: International Journal of Security and Development, an argument is made for a comprehensive approach to replace the separate efforts of government agencies, international aid providers, and even neighbouring states to address distort Afghanistan’s overall health, peace, politics, security and development due to illicit revenues from drug cultivation.

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