News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • August 29, 2014

    The Complicated Task of Measuring the World’s Most ‘Peaceful’ Countries

    Where do you have to go to find peace? Earlier this summer, the Institute for Economics and Peace released its annual "Global Peace Index" report. The Sydney-based group, founded by technology entrepreneur Steve Killelea, has been tracking the peacefulness (or its lack) of the world since 2007. This year's report notes that the various conflicts we've seen recently have contributed to the "continuing the global slide in peacefulness which has now been in effect for the last seven years." Some of the findings are striking. As the Independent has noted, the index found that just 11 countries were actually free from conflict, whether internal or external, over the past year.

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  • August 28, 2014

    Towards a Rule of Law Culture: Exploring Effective Responses to Justice and Security Challenges

    The United States Institute of Peace (USIP), in partnership with the International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ), is pleased to announce a call for applications for the five-day course, “Towards a rule of law culture: exploring effective responses to justice and security challenges.” The course will be held from 10-14 November 2014 in Valletta, Malta.

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  • August 28, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: A coterie of powerful Afghan government ministers and officials with strong ties to the security forces are threatening to seize power if an election impasse that has paralyzed the country is not resolved soon.

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  • August 28, 2014

    INPROL BLOG: Myanmar Needs Lawyers like Atticus Finch

    Harper Lee’s fictional lawyer Atticus Finch provides an example of ethical, culturally-aware, empathic lawyering that may inform rule of law scholars and practitioners alike.  In Lee’s novel   ‘To Kill A Mockingbird,’ Atticus is appointed to defend a black man falsely accused of the rape of a white girl.  The crowd has pre-determined the defendant’s guilt based on the color of his skin, and Atticus stands as a lonely voice within an imperfect legal system against the tide of racism and prejudice.  Atticus is personally attacked for his stance but he knows that his children are watching his conduct, has notions of justice, equality, and the substantive rule of law in mind as he works. In Myanmar’s current transformation, the voices of its lawyers have – in the main - been unusually silent. This is unfortunate, as what the country may need the most at the moment are lawyers like Atticus Finch.

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  • August 27, 2014

    The Woman Who Breaks Mega-Dams

    In recent years, indigenous peoples around the world, and particularly in Latin America, have turned to litigation to defend their rights. But Buendía's story speaks as much to the limits as to the potential of "prior consultation" as a guarantor of those rights. As Almut Schilling-Vacaflor and Riccarda Flemmer recently asserted in a paper for the German Institute of Global and Area Studies, effective consultations between governments and indigenous groups on development projects depend on how the legal principle is carried out in practice. Are state institutions impartial and capable of balancing diverse interests? Who holds the real decision-making power: the government, the corporation, or the consulted group? Are the agreements these parties reach binding?

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  • August 26, 2014

    INPROL BLOG: Article Review - Local Accounts of Rule of Law Aid: Implications for Donors by Pip Nicholson and Sally Low

    Academics Pip Nicholson and Sally Low presented their research from Vietnam and Cambodia in a recent article titled “Local Accounts of Rule of Law Aid: Implications for Donors” (Hague Journal on the Rule of Law, March 2013). The authors offer insights into rule of law reform and legal technical assistance, and ponder an obvious, yet often forgotten question: what do “local” actors think about foreign assistance and its providers? They explore who the rule of law reform agenda belongs to (i.e. international or national actors) and why. Nicholson and Low also ask donors what they think about their own work and local counterparts.

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  • August 25, 2014

    Strategic Snapshots: Hybrid Insecurity

    A new International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) research programme explores the threats to long-term development posed by complex security challenges. Virginia Comolli elaborates on the ‘hybrid insecurity’ confronting many developing countries, including the Boko Haram insurgency troubling Africa’s largest economy, instability posed by rapid urbanisation, and the role of organised criminal networks as surrogate providers of public services.

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  • August 22, 2014

    How Can We Get Better at Promoting Active Citizenship? Lessons from Ten Case Studies

    Lessons on Programme Design: Duncan Green of Oxfam shares highlights from from his paper "Active Citizenship," providing an overview of the patterns that emerged across ten case studies, from which partners are indispensable, to the importance of broad alliances and coalitions. Sections of interest include Lessons on Program Design, Choosing Promising Targets, and Challenges and Weaknesses.

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  • August 22, 2014

    Opinio Juris BLOG: Emerging Voices: Protecting the World’s Children: R2P and Measures Less-Than-Force

    Children are among the most vulnerable during armed conflict.  The existence of special protections for children in the 1949 Geneva Conventions, and the existence of the Convention on the Rights of the Childand the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, all attest to the special vulnerability of children.  The security of children during armed conflict has even been recognised by the Security Council as being a matter of international peace and security (see for example: SCR 1261, SCR 1314, SCR 1379).  Given the importance of protecting children and other vulnerable groups during armed conflict, does the concept of the Responsibility to Protect (‘R2P’) clarify the principles governing international responses to atrocity crimes?

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  • August 21, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Burundi: More than 150 refugees, most of them women and children, were killed and more than 100 others injured, on August 13, 2004, at Gatumba, in one of the worst ethnically targeted attacks in Burundi since the 1990s. The leaders of the armed group that claimed responsibility have not been brought to justice.

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