News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • August 13, 2014

    Peacekeeping Works Better Than You May Think

    If peacekeeping is ineffective and if outsiders can do little to help post-conflict societies transition towards a more stable peace, then Western policymakers and other leaders would be foolish to consider contributing to, or even supporting, such efforts. If, on the other hand, peacekeeping has a reasonably positive record, it would seem foolish for the same policymakers not to support these efforts.

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  • August 12, 2014

    Opinio Juris Emerging Voices: The Contribution of International Criminal Tribunals and Courts to the Development and Promotion of International Human Rights Law

    In the eight years since Cesare Romano’s assertion that the ‘season’ of international criminal law was coming to an end, the season appears to have turned into an Indian summer. During this summer, the focus of international criminal law has evolved. The formative debates on the significance of the idea of aggression and the conceptual boundaries of genocide have developed into a discussion on how to use such concepts in order to protect individuals, regardless of traditional concerns such as a state link or sponsorship of the violence. This shift in focus indicates a continued interest in the idea of international criminal law, and the aim of creating a system of international criminal justice, but with greater attention to the protection of individuals. As such, the reason for continuing interest in international criminal law can be explored in relation to two strands of reasoning: the fading of the State requirement, and the shared purpose of international human rights law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law.

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  • August 11, 2014

    Foreign Policy BLOG: Immunity Cannot Allow Impunity

    African leaders want to exempt themselves from prosecution for terrible crimes -- but new research shows their people aren't as forgiving as they might think. 

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  • August 11, 2014

    A Revolution in Peacebuilding (Development, and Humanitarian) Affairs?

    One of the key problems facing the peacebuilding, humanitarian and development communities is that in an age of structural violence and structural war,  the liberal peace/ neoliberal state model of the last quarter of a century has lost access and legitimacy, to greater or lesser degrees, partly in parallel with the apparent decline of the status and reach of the US, EU, and UK. The model has had difficulty dealing with open as well as structural violence, and indeed, may have carried forward structural violence in some cases. Such approaches have lost traction with recipient political leaders (who often have a lot to lose) and can now shop around the ‘new’ (and not so fussy) donors.

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  • August 8, 2014

    Opinio Juris Emerging Voices BLOG: The Rights of Women in Armed Conflict

    Imagine there is a potential peace agreement that would end a civil war, but only at the cost of leaving portions of the country in question in the hands of a group that systematically violates the human rights women and girls.  The government is backed by a foreign state who, in the past, effectively occupied the country.  Some policy considerations are obvious – continued armed conflict can be devastating to most involved, but resolving the armed conflict with a solution that denies at least half of the population their rights is deplorable.  But is this a purely pragmatic, policy question?

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  • August 8, 2014

    Lessons from Bosnia: What is the Real Impact of Peacekeeping?

    The conflicts in Iraq, Syria and Ukraine have been accompanied by calls for intervention from foreign countries. One possibility for this form of intervention would be a peacekeeping mission of the kind conducted by the UN in Bosnia during the 1990s, but do such missions actually have the capacity to stabilise conflict-torn regions?

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  • August 8, 2014

    Is Central America's Gang Violence a Humanitarian Crisis?

    A recent report by the Geneva-based Assessment Capacity Project (ACAPS) examines the humanitarian consequences of the violence afflicting the "Northern Triangle" countries of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. It looks at how humanitarian actors can conceptualize and respond to this violence. The authors note that the humanitarian consequences of the insecurity in these countries -- which the report terms "other situations of violence" (OSV) based on International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) terminology -- are very similar to those of a conventional armed conflict, even if the violence does not have the same political roots.

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  • August 7, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: Hundreds of young children in Afghanistan are being forced to share a jail cell with their mothers; women who in many cases are protesting their innocence or have been convicted of so-called moral crimes. 

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  • August 7, 2014

    What is The Common Law of War?

    Since the recent al Bahlul en banc decision before the D.C. Circuit, I have been thinking a lot about the Common Law of War. As others have already analyzed in detail (Steve, Peter, Jonathan, Marty & Steve), the D.C. Circuit upheld Bahlul’s conviction for conspiracy but threw out his conviction for material support for terrorism and solicitation. Material support and solicitation are unavailable for pre-2006 conduct because they are neither international crimes nor historically charged before military commissions. Conspiracy, on the other hand, is a different story. While it seems pretty clear that conspiracy is not a stand-alone offense under international law, the government has relied on the argument that conspiracy is historically chargeable before a military commission as part of the “common law of war.”

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  • August 7, 2014

    How Drug Trafficking Undermines West Africa

    A new report from a panel of West African leaders, Not Just in Transit: Drugs, the State and Society in West Africa, highlights the magnitude of drug-related problems in the region. Compounding the damage caused by trafficking, the criminalization of drug use and possession puts a huge burden on already weak criminal justice systems and encourages corruption.

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