News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • July 17, 2014

    Overfishing, Pollution, Climate Change, and Terrible Governance. Are the Oceans Failed States?

    Scientists have known for decades that the seas are in trouble. But the commission's report goes further than earlier assessments in blaming the ocean's precarious position on the lack of effective governance by international institutions. Like so many citizenries, the populations of the sea are victims of ineffectual bureaucracies. Resources are being plundered with impunity by the wealthy, and there is no police force or established judiciary to maintain the rule of law, the commission said.

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  • July 17, 2014

    Unesco Highlights Freedom of Expression, Media Development in New Report

    "Tectonic shifts" in technology are having mixed results for freedom of expression and media development - sparking unprecedented creativity and dialogue, while also ushering in increased use of censorship policies and measures that do not comply with international norms - the United Nations cultural agency reports in a study being launched today at Headquarters.

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  • July 17, 2014

    The ICC in Palestine: Threat or Promise?

    With the backdrop of growing tensions and violence in Gaza, the question of whether the International Criminal Court (ICC) will intervene in Palestine has come back to the fore.

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  • July 16, 2014

    The Silent Power of Boycotts and Blockades

    While not often on the news, the efficacy of the peace movement is being documented elsewhere. Analysing a century’s worth of data, the World Peace Foundation found that between 1900 and 2006, nonviolent movements had a 53-percent success rate, compared to a 22-percent success rate for violent movements. Other tangible successes include the long list of victories recently secured by the Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, according to Omar Barghouti, a founding committee member of the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI).

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  • July 16, 2014

    Even War Criminals Have a Fundamental Right to a Fair and Impartial Trial

    These men are no ordinary failed asylum seekers. What is special about their case is that they are the first witnesses at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague who testified before the court and then requested asylum in the Netherlands. They claimed that their safety and human rights would be violated if they were returned to Congo since some of their testimony had implicated the Congolese president, Joseph Kabila, and they had languished without charge or due process in a Congolese prison for years prior to coming to testify. Their case created a host of complex legal problems and was a major headache for the ICC, and the Dutch and Congolese governments. On Sunday their legal battle for protection in the Netherlands ended. The men now face the risk that they won’t receive a fair trial before national courts in Congo.

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  • July 16, 2014

    World Bank BLOG: The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race to Reinvent the State

    Can liberal constitutional democracy run the state in a manner that is both responsive and accountable to citizens without succumbing to incurable elephantiasis precisely because it is democratic? Does democratic governance inevitably lead to government as an ‘all-you-can eat- buffet’ (allegedly per Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore), and, therefore, bloat, fiscal crises and collapse?

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  • July 16, 2014

    OxFam BLOG: Strengthening Active Citizenship After a Traumatic Civil War: Dilemmas and Ideas in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    There is a crisis of trust between the public and CSOs, which are poorly regulated, often seen as little more than ‘briefcase NGOs’, only interested in winning funding, and under constant attack from politicians. Many CSOs seem pretty disillusioned, faced with a shrinking donor pot and public hostility. 

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  • July 15, 2014

    Open Society Foundations Voices BLOG: Moving Forwards a Global Vision for Legal Aid

    Last month in Johannesburg, over 250 justice and law experts from governments and civil society from almost 70 countries sat down for three days and tried to work out what to do next to turn that vision of accessible legal aid into reality. The meeting reaffirmed the need for the rapid implementation of the new UN Principles and Guidelines. It also underlined the broader impact of legal aid as a tool that can not only protect the rights of suspects, but which also “improves the administration of justice, increases public trust in justice and can boost socio-economic development at the family and community level.” As such, the final Johannesburg Declaration called on UN member states to include the rule of law and access to justice, including equal access to legal aid as a target of the post 2015 development agenda, as well as had specific asks for other criminal justice actors.

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  • July 15, 2014

    Information and Communications Technologies in Conflict Early Warning – Possibilities and Challenges

    Conflict early warning, traditionally the preserve of large multilateral efforts and statistical modelling, has taken a local turn in the last seven years. Some of this is a recognition of the inherent problems with using country-level data to try to predict the outbreak of local violence. Another problem is the capacity of large multilateral entities to act quickly to stop violence. Information and communications technologies (ICTs) and mobile phones in particular can be an aid in early warning and violence prevention at the local level, where both the knowledge and the desire to prevent violence are available. To be successful though, ICT supported programs must start with a reliable analysis of local conflict dynamics.

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  • July 15, 2014

    Opinio Juris BLOG: Self-Defense – Weapons, Lawful Commands, Duty to Retreat and Summary

    The Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC) prohibits the use of certain weapons. Under the Rome Statute and the Australian Commonwealth Criminal Code, it is a war crime to employ poison or poisoned weapons, prohibited gases, or prohibited bullets. In contrast, the law of self-defence does not specifically address the means of response to a threat, but rather merely requires the response to be necessary, reasonable and proportional.

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