News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • September 4, 2014

    Harnessing Rising Powers for Leading Role in Humanitarian and Peace Keeping Operations

    If we are going to be able to harness the hard and soft power of emerging nations, we need to develop a way to analyse external activities on a country-by-country basis. Potential indicators might include the money spent on humanitarian aid and peace operations, the number of personnel deployed in peacekeeping missions, an assessment of a country’s diplomatic presence, alongside the educational and cultural projects it is involved with.

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  • September 4, 2014

    Incorporating Cultural and Religious Practices into Transitional Justice: Lessons Related to Islam in Tunisia and Aceh, Indonesia

    Effectively incorporating local cultural or religious traditions into transitional justice processes is not as straightforward as it might seem to be. One aspect of the challenge is well illustrated by Tunisia’s experience with transitional justice since the Arab Spring. In Tunisia, there is very strong support for Islam playing a role in the country’s political life. Yet Tunisian transitional justice has not drawn upon the Islamic tradition and would almost certainly not have been able to do so in a way that contributes to the ultimate success of transitional justice there. Why?   This article answers that question by focusing upon the circumstances of Tunisian transitional justice and by comparing them to the transitional justice process in Aceh, Indonesia, where Islamic practices were to some degree drawn upon. These case studies demonstrate that local cultural or religious practices must have widespread legitimacy and popular acceptance if they are to effectively contribute to transitional justice.

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  • September 3, 2014

    Security Sector Reform Resource Centre BLOG: Security Sector Reform: Past Present and Future?

    For some analysts and policy makers, the lack of discipline, efficacy, or control among national security forces rings like a clarion call for security sector reform (SSR). However, after more than ten years of cobbling together a rather uneven record, SSR processes continue to focus on supporting state security agents who, if not blatant aggressors, have often proven dishearteningly ineffective.

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  • September 3, 2014

    Go and Suffer This: The Enduring Impact of Death Row and Wrongful Conviction

    Oliver Robertson, Prison Reform International’s death penalty and alternatives project manager, was in Africa from late June to meet with its partners, the Foundation for Human Rights Initiative in Uganda and to attend a Continental Conference in Benin on death penalty abolition in Africa. The death penalty is often handed down in situations where trial procedures are certainly unfair and even chaotic. In both countries, he met people who had experienced wrongful conviction and spent years on death row awaiting execution.

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  • September 2, 2014

    New Report: Women’s Access to Justice in Afghanistan

    Before its fall, Afghanistan’s Taliban regime’s strict enforcement of conservative legal and social norms severely limited the economic, social and political participation of Afghan women. Restrictions on freedom of movement, access to education, and civic participation, in addition to high rates of gender-based and domestic violence combined to make Afghanistan “the worst place in the world to be born a woman.”

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  • September 2, 2014

    In Search of Security: "There to Keep the Peace"

    Part of the "Whose Police?" collection of interviews with citizens, analysts and activists around the world explore the question: where does security come from? In this edition, openSecurity shows testimony of the violence of a police-led eviction, and the experience of policing strategies informed by racist stereotypes defining Travellers as "criminals."

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  • August 29, 2014

    The Complicated Task of Measuring the World’s Most ‘Peaceful’ Countries

    Where do you have to go to find peace? Earlier this summer, the Institute for Economics and Peace released its annual "Global Peace Index" report. The Sydney-based group, founded by technology entrepreneur Steve Killelea, has been tracking the peacefulness (or its lack) of the world since 2007. This year's report notes that the various conflicts we've seen recently have contributed to the "continuing the global slide in peacefulness which has now been in effect for the last seven years." Some of the findings are striking. As the Independent has noted, the index found that just 11 countries were actually free from conflict, whether internal or external, over the past year.

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  • August 28, 2014

    Towards a Rule of Law Culture: Exploring Effective Responses to Justice and Security Challenges

    The United States Institute of Peace (USIP), in partnership with the International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ), is pleased to announce a call for applications for the five-day course, “Towards a rule of law culture: exploring effective responses to justice and security challenges.” The course will be held from 10-14 November 2014 in Valletta, Malta.

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  • August 28, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: A coterie of powerful Afghan government ministers and officials with strong ties to the security forces are threatening to seize power if an election impasse that has paralyzed the country is not resolved soon.

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  • August 28, 2014

    INPROL BLOG: Myanmar Needs Lawyers like Atticus Finch

    Harper Lee’s fictional lawyer Atticus Finch provides an example of ethical, culturally-aware, empathic lawyering that may inform rule of law scholars and practitioners alike.  In Lee’s novel   ‘To Kill A Mockingbird,’ Atticus is appointed to defend a black man falsely accused of the rape of a white girl.  The crowd has pre-determined the defendant’s guilt based on the color of his skin, and Atticus stands as a lonely voice within an imperfect legal system against the tide of racism and prejudice.  Atticus is personally attacked for his stance but he knows that his children are watching his conduct, has notions of justice, equality, and the substantive rule of law in mind as he works. In Myanmar’s current transformation, the voices of its lawyers have – in the main - been unusually silent. This is unfortunate, as what the country may need the most at the moment are lawyers like Atticus Finch.

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