News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • July 15, 2014

    Opinio Juris BLOG: Self-Defense – Weapons, Lawful Commands, Duty to Retreat and Summary

    The Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC) prohibits the use of certain weapons. Under the Rome Statute and the Australian Commonwealth Criminal Code, it is a war crime to employ poison or poisoned weapons, prohibited gases, or prohibited bullets. In contrast, the law of self-defence does not specifically address the means of response to a threat, but rather merely requires the response to be necessary, reasonable and proportional.

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  • July 15, 2014

    Can Community Policing Combat al-Shabaab?

    Can community policing deter terrorism in weak states where government security sectors are unable to cope with violent extremism? This is a question of mounting urgency in a number of countries beset by terrorist groups, including Iraq and Nigeria.

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  • July 14, 2014

    Fair Trial BLOG: Bo Xilai’s Trial Highlights the Importance of Open Justice

    Real openness of criminal proceedings is a key feature of the rule of law and of open justice. As the saying goes: “Not only must Justice be done; it must also be seen to be done.” Public and press scrutiny safeguard the fairness of the trial and, by allowing the public to see how justice is administered, builds public trust in the quality of justice and the fairness of its outcome. In a country where the Supreme People’s Court itself proclaims an astonishing 99.5% conviction rate, China is clearly a long way from respecting the rule of law. And what happens when the rule of law collapses?

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  • July 14, 2014

    European Journal of International Law BLOG: Four Scenarios on the Relationship between International Humanitarian Law and International Human Rights Law

    The issue of the relationship between international humanitarian law and international human rights law is often mixed together with other difficult questions of international law. This is not very conducive to conceptual clarity. One way of advancing that clarity is to construct hypotheticals which isolate as many of the various issues as possible, so that we can through a thought experiment better appreciate both how they operate individually and how they interact with one another, and move through them carefully, step by step, while resisting the temptation of introducing further complicating considerations.

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  • July 14, 2014

    United Nations to Recognize Gay Marriages of All Its Staff

    The United Nations (UN) has begun to recognize same-sex marriages of all its staff members worldwide, regardless of whether the employee's home country recognizes such unions, the world body announced on Monday, though some UN agencies are not covered by the new policy. The policy change - which took effect on June 26 - comes after Ban said in mid-May that all employees of the world body deserve to be treated equally. It also comes more than 2.5 years after Ban held the first-ever meeting of any Secretary-General with representatives of UN-GLOBE, who have campaigned for years for full equality and non-discrimination of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex (LGBTI) staff in the UN system.

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  • July 14, 2014

    EU Migration Policies Put Lives and Rights At Risk

    The human cost of Fortress Europe: Human rights violations against migrants and refugees at Europe's borders, shows how EU migration policies and border control practices are preventing refugees from accessing asylum in the EU and putting their lives at risk in the course of increasingly perilous journeys. "The effectiveness of EU measures to stem the flow of irregular migrants and refugees is, at best, questionable. Meanwhile, the cost in human lives and misery is incalculable and is being paid by some of the world's most vulnerable people," said John Dalhuisen, Europe and Central Asia Programme Director at Amnesty International.

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  • July 11, 2014

    Special Report: Truth, Justice and Reconciliation

    "Healing is a process. How we deal with the truth after its telling defines the success of the process. And this is where we have fallen tragically short. By choosing not to follow through on the commission's recommendations, government not only compromised the commission's contribution to the process, but the very process itself." - The Most Reverend Archbishop Desmond Tutu

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  • July 11, 2014

    World Bank Governance for Development Blog: Measuring Corruption Risk Using ‘Big’ Public Procurement Data in Central & Eastern Europe

    In view of corruption being clandestine, the  Corruption Research Center Budapest (CRCB)’s approach lays emphasis on bringing to light seemingly innocuous traces of corruption in official records of public procurement, firm financial information, ownership of companies, and various records of public officials based on an understanding of the country context. They are based on the assumption that corrupt agencies are adept at “covering their tracks” with regard to the formal legal framework for public procurement. On the surface, the process looked impartial, transparent, fair, open, provided equal access to bidders and promoted competition. The process nevertheless may have left some clues that hinted at manifestations of corruption.

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  • July 10, 2014

    What is the Cost of Hatred Against the World’s Minorities?

    The report found that hate crime and hate speech against minority groups and indigenous peoples are prevalent globally, from the least to the most developed countries.

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  • July 10, 2014

    Calls for Media Freedom to be Included in Post-2015 Development Goals

    A growing international coalition has come together in the belief that sustainable development cannot be achieved “without public access to reliable information about health, education, the environment, and other critical development areas - and that requires independent monitoring of that data by media and civil society,” as William Orme, UN representative for the Brussels-based Global Forum for Media Development (GFMD), characterized the stakes. But will this notion be enshrined in the Sustainable Development Goals, currently under discussion in a series Open Working Group meetings? And if so, what will the precise wording be?

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