News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • October 7, 2014

    Transconflict BLOG: On Peacekeeping

    An effective law is required to regulate peacekeeping missions; one that provides a standardized basis for the behaviour of peacekeepers, including issues such as the potential use of force and questions of impunity.

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  • October 7, 2014

    Prosecutions of Massive Violations Key for Post-Conflict States, says New Report

    In the wake of armed conflict or widespread violence, States should employ criminal accountability to hold perpetrators of serious crimes accountable for their actions, says a new report from the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion of truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence. In his presentation before the Human Rights Council earlier this month, UN Special Rapporteur Pablo de Greiff warned that “despite clear international obligations, only a fraction of perpetrators of massive violations are ever investigated and prosecuted”, and called on post-conflict States to pursue accountability for serious crimes by adopting comprehensive prosecutorial strategies in as part of larger transitional justice process.

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  • October 7, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: There are precedents in modern Afghan history for the collapse of the security sector when external security assistance dries up. While a political catastrophe has been headed off for now, a stubborn security crisis is worsening by the day.

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  • October 3, 2014

    Open Security BLOG: Alternatives to Military Intervention: A Commando Team of Mediators

    Non-military intervention options are insufficiently considered and there is little place in the relevant systems for serious, well-resourced early intervention and mediation to attempt to prevent the outbreak of violence. In the weary debate on intervention of recent years, more nuanced and subtle voices questioning the consequences of using force as a means of intervention have often been dismissed as naïve left-wingers. People of all shades of opinion get caught up in debate about “doing the right thing” but insufficient thought is given to how we do this and whether we can get serious about well-resourced, non-military intervention.

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  • October 3, 2014

    The Peace Bridge to Nowhere

    Changing how peacebuilding organizations measure success could save aid projects that are stuck trying to meet rigid, dated, and increasingly arbitrary goals in conflict zones.

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  • October 2, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Australia: The Australian Senate passed a sweeping new ‘anti-terror’ law that will allow the Australian government to conduct mass surveillance on all of its citizens, will make whistleblowing on intelligence issues a crime, and threatens to criminalize basic reporting.

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  • October 2, 2014

    Opinio Juris BLOG: What do Russian Lawyers Say about Crimea?

    One of the rare English-language documents produced by Russian experts in international law is a June 2014 appeal to the ILA by the President of the Russian Association of International Law, Prof. Anatoliy Kapustin. Before that, in April 2014 the same Association held a conference on the international law aspects of Crimea’s integration into Russia together with the Russian Academy of Diplomacy (in Russian). This event, which brought together senior Russian academics and diplomats, reflects the very close connections between the international law profession and the state apparatus that exist in Russia. Taken together, Prof. Kapustin’s letter and the April 2014 conference seem to espouse the views of Russia’s international law elite on Crimea.

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  • October 2, 2014

    In Pursuit of Peace BLOG: Gulf of Guinea: A Regional Solution to Piracy?

    In its December 2012 report The Gulf of Guinea: The New Danger Zone, Crisis Group analysed the emergence of acts of piracy and armed robbery in the Gulf of Guinea and recommended a two-pronged, long-term response: building a regional maritime security architecture and improving the economic and security governance of the states in the region. While the region is working to develop the security architecture, it also needs to tackle the illicit economic dimensions of the overall situation.

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  • October 2, 2014

    Women in Prison: Information Vacuums, Harms and Human Rights

    Although women face many risks and problems in prison, they may be less likely to complain, seek information, make requests or challenge authority compared to men. This may be coloured, among other factors, by a particularly restrictive background, a desire to protect children with them in detention or like a great many detained women, survival of sustained domestic violence. And for those who do try, as our study found, the information may not be within reach, relevant to their situation or delivered in a way that they understand.

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  • October 1, 2014

    New English Translation of the Afghan Civil Code

    The Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) publicly releases its English translation of the Afghan Civil Code this week. This is very significant for the legal and private sectors in Afghanistan, which have been operating without reliable English translations of two of the country’s three most important sources of law (the others being the Criminal Code and Commercial Code). The lack of reliable translations is debilitating, particularly in light of the number of international lawyers and consultants operating in-country. ALEP conceived of the project when students were tasked with writing a textbook on the law of obligations and couldn’t read the contracts or personal responsibility portions of the Code. The Civil Code also covers family law, property law, inheritance, and a virtually all laws governing private life in Afghanistan. ALEP mobilized its textbook translation resources to produce a professional-quality translation and is doing the same with the Afghan Commercial Code, which it plans to release in late 2014. ALEP is grateful to Elite Legal Services, Ltd. and Mohammad Fahim Barkmaki for their translation services.

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