News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • November 11, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Bangladesh: The 1971 War of Liberation in what is now Bangladesh must be remembered as one of the worst conflicts in modern history. But that there has been no effective accountability mechanism on the international level will forever be a stain on the reputation of the international community.

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  • November 10, 2014

    International Peace Institute BLOG: Video - Enhancing the Political Participation of Women and Youth in the Sahel and Maghreb

    On November 5th, International Peace Institute (IPI) hosted a policy forum focusing on the building of peace and development in the Sahel and Maghreb through the political participation of women and youth. At this event, IPI shared the highlights of a new report on this topic, based on field research conducted in Mali, Niger, and Senegal and a regional conference in Rabat, Morocco.

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  • November 10, 2014

    Governance and Justice: "Life Imprisonment"

    Dirk van Zyl Smit, Professor of Comparative and International Penal Law at the University of Nottingham speaks on life imprisonment around the world - its consequences, policy implications, and emerging jurisprudence. From the 2012 -- 2013 Hoffinger Criminal Justice Forum at New York University.

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  • November 10, 2014

    The Deadly Genius of Drug Cartels

    Up to 100,000 people died in drug-related violence in Mexico in the last 6 years. We might think this has nothing to do with us, but in fact we are all complicit, says Yale professor Rodrigo Canales in this unflinching talk that turns conventional wisdom about drug cartels on its head. The carnage is not about faceless, ignorant goons mindlessly killing each other but is rather the result of some seriously sophisticated brand management.

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  • November 7, 2014

    Seeking Input on a Global Study on Legal Aid

    The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) are conducting a  Global Study on Legal Aid which is intended to provide a global baseline on the provision of legal aid (civil and criminal). In the course of the coming months, surveys will be developed for Member States and civil society experts on the availability and accessibility of legal aid, complemented by a few in-depth case studies. They are looking for non-governmental experts who are willing to respond to the survey's questions on their countries, and for academic institutions who are planning to conduct or already conducting research on access to legal aid and would want to partner with UNODC/UNDP for specific case studies.

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  • November 7, 2014

    The Global Anticorruption BLOG: The Double Jeopardy Bar Should Not Apply When Acquittals Are Tainted By Corruption

    All around the world, a culture of impunity impedes the effective criminal prosecution of corruption cases, particularly of senior government officials and their close associates. Due to the interference of power political actors, judges and prosecutors often do not pursue these cases promptly or properly. Although there has been some attention to concerns about prosecutors dropping or shelving cases, there is a closely related problem that is even more difficult, and that has received much less attention: fraudulently obtained acquittals, or contaminated absolutions.

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  • November 7, 2014

    Corruption: a Significant Factor in Human Rights Violations in Many Criminal Justice Systems

    Corruption occurs at every stage of the criminal justice chain. It occurs in police stations, prosecutors’ offices, the judiciary and in prisons. It might be a reason why a person is detained in the first place, but it might also affect their ability to access due process, to access the most basic rights and services in detention, and even their ability to stay safe from harm. While anecdotal evidence about corrupt activities is plentiful, more attention is now being paid by high-level bodies and by civil society organisations, including PRI, to examining the links between the protection of human rights and corruption. PRI’s Policy Director, Andrea Huber, describes the numerous ways in which corruption manifests itself in many criminal justice systems.

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  • November 6, 2014

    The Conversation BLOG: Investing in People Not Tools: How to Fulfill the Promise of 'Civic Tech'

    Too many of the civic tech tools available today simply enable participation by lowering the costs of engagement for people who already have the capacity to act. They do nothing to build that capacity among people who do not yet have it. Civic tech, therefore, is limited in its reach. Why does does this matter? Three stories from the world of business, health, and politics, illustrate the importance of transforming people’s capacity to act.

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  • November 6, 2014

    World Bank Civic Space Initiative BLOG: Access to Resources Critical to Peaceful Assembly

    Globally, civil society organizations (CSOs) face many obstacles. One of the most pressing regards laws and practices that constrain their ability to obtain or utilize financial, material, and human resources, including; requiring CSOs to obtain governmental approval to receive funding, banning or restricting foreign-funded CSOs from human rights or advocacy activities, stigmatizing or delegitimizing foreign-funded CSOs and labeling them as “foreign agents” or other negative terms, criminalizing some peaceful activities, and restricting their ability to build solidarity with other CSOs. These obstacles hinder the right of CSOs to peaceful assembly and association. In the following video, Ryota Jonen of the Civic Space Initiative affirms this right, saying, “To exercise fully the rights to freedom of association, we need to have resources, we need materials to carry out what we are said to do.'

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  • November 5, 2014

    Justice in Conflict BLOG: What Counts as Evidence of Syria’s War Crimes?

    For the last few years, a small number of private non-governmental organizations have been investigating and documenting evidence of crimes committed in Syria. But what are the risks of such investigations? Do they outweigh the benefits? And is this the birth of a new model for investigating mass atrocities in war zones?

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