News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • October 22, 2014

    Unprecedented Case Proposes Land Grabbing as a Crime Against Humanity

    A communication filed at the International Criminal Court (ICC) [October 7] alleges that widespread and systematic land grabbing conducted by the Cambodian ruling elite for over a decade amounts to a crime against humanity.

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  • October 22, 2014

    A Short Guide to General Comment No.1: Children of Incarcerated and Imprisoned Parents and Primary Caretakers

    This short guide provides an illustrated summary, section by section, of the first ever General Comment by the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child on Children of incarcerated and imprisoned parents and primary caregivers (Article 30 of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child). It covers:

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  • October 21, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Algeria: Refugees from the Western Sahara conflict who have been living in camps in the Algerian desert for four decades seem to be generally able to leave the camps if they wish, but face curbs on some rights, Human Rights Watch said in a report issued today. The camps are run by the Polisario Front, which seeks self-determination for Western Sahara, a former Spanish colony that Morocco has occupied since 1975.

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  • October 20, 2014

    Hague Institute for the Internationalization of Law BLOG: Politically Smart and Locally-Led Justice Programming

    Director of the Hague Institute for Internationalization of Law Sam Muller shares his thoughts on a recent Overseas Development Institute meeting on locally led justice programming, where the content implied that most justice programming is politically dumb, top-down, and internationally-led; none good things.

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  • October 20, 2014

    Networking the Networks to Fight Opiate Trafficking

    The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime 'Networking the Networks' initiative aims to establish a criminal intelligence network in an innovative approach to confronting illicit drugs and crime across regions. It links national, regional and inter-regional law enforcement bodies to create better coordination, share information and better assist in tracking criminal proceeds. Such measures will help increase prosecutions against transnational organized crime.

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  • October 17, 2014

    International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) BLOG: Internationally-led Justice Efforts in Mali Must Consider National Context, Adapt to Local Needs

    Two years after a rebellion cast Mali in a year of war, the country has yet to see justice for the widespread harm and suffering its citizens endured. While there is increasing attention for proposed transitional justice efforts, projects to address the past been planned sporadically, and have been considerably dislocated from the needs and wishes of those they are meant to serve. ICTJ's new assessment report, "Possibilities and Challenges for Transitional Justice in Mali," looks at the potential for effective transitional justice approaches that are reflective of the primary concerns and demands of citizens.

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  • October 17, 2014

    International Law Visualized

    Are you confused by International Law? Do you have questions like: What is customary law?  How is International Law enforced? This infographic provides a useful overview of International Law, its sources, enforcement mechanisms and the individuals it aims to protect.

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  • October 16, 2014

    Global Anticorruption BLOG: Who Guards the Guardians in the Anticorruption Battle? Compelling Prosecutors to Take Action

    Article 30(3) of United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) calls upon state parties to ensure that any legal discretion pertinent to the prosecution of corruption is exercised to “to maximize the effectiveness of law enforcement.” Yet there is evidence that prosecutors do not always exercise their discretion in anticorruption cases in a manner that conforms to this principle. Prosecutorial decisions to shelve or terminate a case might instead be influenced by economic considerations — as when a large financial institution is involved, or when prosecution risks losing a valuable foreign investor — and by political considerations — as when the case may influence foreign diplomatic relations or when the case involves senior officials or other parties close to the governing regime.

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  • October 16, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: Afghanistan’s new government should take urgent steps to combat sexual harassment of women in education, employment, and public life, Human Rights Watch reports. There are no laws in Afghanistan that specifically prohibit sexual harassment or protect victims.

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  • October 15, 2014

    Council on Foreign Relations BLOG: Viewing the U.S.–Afghan Bilateral Security Agreement Through a Gender Lens

    The bilateral security agreement has important implications for Afghanistan’s future; not only does it pave the way for Afghanistan to receive continued U.S. military training support and additional U.S. aid, but its enactment will also create increased confidence for other nations and private investors to provide development and economic assistance to Afghanistan. These implications are particularly significant for Afghanistan’s women and girls. Security is essential for women’s participation in public life; without it, women and girls are unable to leave their homes without risking their lives, limiting their ability to work, run for office, or seek an education.

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