News + Features

INPROL facilitates the sharing of information and knowledge among the rule of law community. This page provides members with news on latest developments in the rule of law field, innovative projects and new publications.

  • September 16, 2014

    New Security Beat BLOG: ISIS’s Cruelty Toward Women Gets Scant Attention

    ISIS has received considerable world attention for its savage beheadings, executions of captured soldiers and men in conquered towns and villages, violence against Christians and Shiites, and the destruction of non-Sunni shrines and places of worship. But its barbarity against women has been treated as a side issue. Arab and Muslim governments, vocal on the threat ISIS poses to regional stability, have been virtually silent on ISIS’s systemic degradation, abuse, and humiliation of women. To the men of ISIS, women are an inferior race, to be enjoyed for sex and be discarded, or to be sold off as slaves.

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  • September 16, 2014

    Surviving Violence: Transgressing Categories and Boundaries in Armed Conflicts

    The persistent limitations in the civilian protection agenda have led some scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers to turn their attention away from the ‘top-down’ macro level and towards the ‘bottom-up’ micro level of analysis. Instead of understanding civilian protection as activities to be conducted in compliance with international law by states, multilateral institutions, or international organisations, attention is rapidly shifting towards the strategies used by civilians themselves. Conflict-affected populations rely on a sophisticated knowledge and assessment of their environment while simultaneously deploying and adapting their coping strategies to navigate violence. The aim of this new area of praxis is to examine the various self-protection strategies undertaken by individuals and communities affected by mass violence and atrocities. This emerging literature is largely based on the premise that individuals are often the first and last to guarantee their own safety during times of armed violence. Despite increasing attention towards self-protection tactics, however, there is little consensus on what self-protection means in both theory and practice.

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  • September 16, 2014

    What Role for UN Peacekeepers in Tackling Ebola?

    Comprised of around 4,500 troops, including eight formed police units, with a presence in 11 of 15 of Liberian counties, the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) represents a sizable international military and civilian presence in the country at a time when outside assistance is sorely needed. Depending on how the Ebola crisis evolves, UNMIL could prove to be the lynchpin of international efforts to maintain peace and security in the country. Alternatively, it could end up doing more harm than good. It is therefore worth asking what role UNMIL is playing in the fight against Ebola. What are peacekeepers doing to stop the virus and protect civilians? Can and should they be doing more?

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  • September 15, 2014

    European Journal of International Law BLOG: Refusing to Negotiate Can Have Tragic Consequences

    On August 19, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) released a video showing the beheading of American journalist James Foley, after the United States government refused to pay a nine-figure ransom. Foley’s execution prompted a debate about the propriety of paying ransoms:  on the one hand, paying can save the life of the captured hostage; on the other hand, paying ransoms fuels the very activity that gave rise to the need to pay a ransom in the first place.

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  • September 15, 2014

    TED: A Vision of Crimes in the Future

    The world is becoming increasingly open, and that has implications both bright and dangerous. Marc Goodman paints a portrait of a grave future, in which technology's rapid development could allow crime to take a turn for the worse.

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  • September 12, 2014

    World Bank BLOG: What Agha the Pakistani Street Child Thinks About Terrorism Will Surprise You

    A small boy ekes out a daily meal of naan and curry by picking up garbage in the streets of Lahore. That’s the premise of “I am Agha,” a short documentary film posted by three Pakistani filmmakers on a site called Pakistan Calling.   Watch the film to find out what Agha says about his life and what he thinks about terrorism.  Then reconsider what you think are Pakistan’s greatest problems.

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  • September 12, 2014

    New International Peace Institute Documentary Film on Past and Future of International Affairs

     As part of its work on advocating and implementing lessons learned from 1814 and 1914 for today, the International Peace Institute (IPI), with the support of Canada and Norway, has created a short documentary film entitled "Architects and Sleepwalkers." The film recalls that the leaders who met at the Congress in Vienna in 1814, towards the end of the Napoleonic wars, were architects of a new international system, while the leaders of 1914 have famously been described as sleepwalkers, stumbling into war. The film’s narrator, prize-winning historian Margaret MacMillan asks: “What lessons can be learned from these pivotal moments in history to address emerging threats and reduce the risk of future conflicts? And what will future historians say about the leaders of today: were they architects or sleepwalkers?”

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  • September 11, 2014

    IN BRIEF: Rule of Law News from Around the World

    Afghanistan: In a recent report, Amnesty International documented the almost complete lack of justice for civilian casualties caused by US and other NATO forces in Afghanistan. The report focused mainly on US forces, which have comprised the majority of international forces in Afghanistan and have been implicated in the large majority of cases involving civilian casualties.

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  • September 11, 2014

    European Journal of International Law BLOG: Tennyson’s “Locksley Hall”: A Disappointed Dream of Peace Through Law

    In “Locksley Hall"–a lesser known masterpiece of Alfred, Lord Tennyson–a soldier ruminates on the disappointments of his youthful passion and idealism. Follow the link to an excerpt in which the narrator reflects on his earlier vision of a future of peace through international law and commerce and his later disillusionment with that dream. The poem is remarkably post-modern given that it was first published in 1842. Despite the skepticism of the modernist, internationalist project expressed in the poem, Winston Churchill reportedly called it “the most wonderful of modern prophecies,” and U.S. President Harry Truman–in office when the UN was formed with his strong support–is said to have carried it in his wallet.

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  • September 11, 2014

    Unlock the Mystery of Mental Illness with Crisis Intervention Teams – A Community Approach to Officer Safety

    Officer safety is of paramount importance to law enforcement leadership. It is embedded in the police culture at every level. Simply explained, the goal of every officer is to go home every day. When the unthinkable occurs, the last thing a chief wants to do is tell a family that the death of their loved one was preventable. As violence against police officers continues, concern for the safety of officers remains an ongoing responsibility and priority.

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