Rule of Law News

1098 Results
  • Should international donors support informal justice providers? And if so, should they also aim to strengthen the linkages between formal and informal justice? These are key questions that keep coming up but lack a satisfactory answer. This blog suggests that it might be helpful to look at other sectors in which linkages between state and non-state actors are already in place.

    To...

  • This report exposes how “policy capture,” where public decisions over policies are consistently or repeatedly directed away from the public interest towards a specific interest, can exacerbate inequalities and undermine democratic values, economic growth and trust in government. It maps out the different mechanisms and risks of policy capture, and provides guidance for policy makers on how to...

  • A new briefing paper from the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) provides guidance for national courts issuing decisions on redress of human rights violations involving sexual violence. It encourages judges, advocates and prosecutors to consider the full range of possible forms of redress when ordering reparations for victims, to make use of relevant national and...

  • A few years ago, satellite images were seen as a decisive technological advance that could reveal the truth about war crimes. Satellite images provided essential confirmation of atrocities in Srebrenica and Sudan. But those who violate human rights have learned from this, and are now devising counter-strategies.

    Read more here via JusticeInfo.net.

    INPROL members can login and...

  • Afghanistan’s system for fighting corruption has too many separate anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) and not enough coordination or independence to be effective, according to new research by Transparency International, which is recommending an overhaul of the current structures.

    'Bridging the gaps: enhancing the effectiveness of Afghanistan’s anti-corruption agencies' analyses the nine...

  • When nations make the transition from internal violent conflict to the rule of law, a new constitution is often a key ingredient for addressing the causes of violence. Drafting a constitution is also an opportune time to rethink the rights of all a nation’s citizens—particularly those of women and girls. On April 12, the U.S. Institute of Peace and U.N. Women convened an international panel of...

  • In his paper, “Upgrading Democracy: ‘Soft Laws’ and the Ombudsman”, Roy Lee (Legislative Counsel in Guernsey and barrister & solicitor admitted in New Zealand and Australia) makes an argument for the creation of the Office of the Ombudsman in order to promote and strengthen democratic governance. Although soft law institutions like the Ombudsman have no power to make legally binding...

  • While development programming is increasingly politically savvy, and women and girls are high on the agenda, it’s bizarre how often gender is overlooked as one of the key determinants of who gets what in the world.

    In our research we’ve been looking at what happens when gender analysis is placed more squarely at the heart of governance work. For example, can it improve our ability to...

  • This briefing gives an overview of what the international and regional standards say regarding the care and treatment of children who are suspected, or convicted, of violent extremist related offences.

    It also looks at some examples of state responses and civil society interventions. It touches upon issues of preventing children’s involvement in violent extremism but is primarily...

  • This Discussion Paper compares how three regional organizations—the African Union, the European Union and the Organization of American States—protect constitutionalism in their member states.

    It focuses on the types of measures to protect constitutionalism in cases of fundamental threats to and violations of the constitutional order, rather than on the mechanisms to promote...

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